N
Projections and Nav Modes
  • Normal View
  • Fisheye View
  • Architectural View
  • Stereographic View
  • Little Planet View
  • Panini View
Click and Drag / QTVR mode
Share this panorama
For Non-Commercial Use Only
This panorama can be embedded into a non-commercial site at no charge. Read more
Do you agree to the Terms & Conditions?
For commercial use, contact us
Embed this Panorama
WidthHeight
For Non-Commercial Use Only
For commercial use, contact us
LICENSE MODAL

1 Like

Tree of Gardens By The Bay, Singapore
Singapore

Gardens by the Bay (Chinese: 滨海湾花园; pinyin: bīnhǎi wān huāyuán Malay: Taman di Pesisiran தமிழ்: வளைகுடா தோட்டம்) is a park spanning 101 hectares (1,010,000 m2) of reclaimed land[1] in central Singapore, adjacent to the Marina Reservoir. The park consists of three waterfront gardens: Bay South Garden, Bay East Garden and Bay Central Garden.The largest of the three gardens is Bay South Garden, standing at 54 hectares.


Gardens by the Bay is an integral part of a strategy by the Singapore government to transform Singapore from a "Garden City" to a "City in a Garden". The stated aim is to raise the quality of life by enhancing greenery and flora in the city.

First announced to the public by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong during the National Day Rally in August 2005, Gardens by the Bay is intended to become Singapore's premier urban outdoor recreation space, and a national icon.

An international competition for the design of the master plan, held in January 2006, attracted more than 70 entries submitted by 170 firms from 24 countries. Two firms – Grant Associates and Gustafson Porter[2] – were eventually awarded the master plan design for the Bay South and Bay East Gardens respectively.

Alongside lead designers Grant Associates, the British design team for Bay South included Wilkinson Eyre Architects (architects); Atelier Ten (environmental design consultants); Atelier One (structural engineers).

This team was also supported by a number of Singapore Consultants including CPG Consultants (architecture, civil and structural, mechanical and electrical), Meinhardt Infrastructure (civil and structural), Langdon Seah (cost consultants) and PMLink (project management).

The park has proven extremely popular for event planners, with demand so high that the park has to limit the number of events to three per week.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardens_by_the_Bay

photo: Sony Zeiss 16-35mm
original size: 20000x10000

View More »

Copyright: Flavio Di Mattia
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Taken: 07/04/2015
Uploaded: 25/01/2016
Updated: 16/02/2016
Views:

...


Tags: garden; bay; marina; sand; people; arts; architecture; cityscape; exterior; day
comments powered by Disqus
More About Singapore

Singapore began as a boat quay at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. Its early days bear few written accounts which are made more difficult to interpret due to the many names it has had. Its original name in Malay meant "island at the end" of the peninsula.In the middle ages there was a settlement here with a trading post and fishing village; today Singapore technically contains sixty-three small islands. Here's a good view of the city from Merlion Park and up close at Raffles Place.From the fifteenth century onwards Singapore's warring neighbors took turns taking over control of the city. Over the past five centuries this port city has been the property of Siam, the Majapahit Empire of Java, Thailand, Portugal, Britain, Japan and Malaysia. Singapore finally achieved its independence in 1959 and has existed as the Republic of Singapore, a UN member nation.Singapore is really interesting because it's one of only five sovereign city-states which survived the colonial expansion period of world history. (The others are Vatican City, Monaco, San Marino and Andorra.) Its history as a busy port city has brought traders from all over the world, and their influence is commemorated in some interesting works of art. For example, see the British tea merchants along the Singapore river, and the Asian Civilizations Museum.In the nineteenth century Singapore was a major port for ships traveling between Europe and East Asia. During WWII the Battle of Singapore ended with the largest British surrender in history -- nearly 130,000 troops.Next time you have the chance to pass through Singapore, make sure to visit the zoo and see the white tigers, and be glad there's a fence in between. Also note how clean the city is, even under a bridge.Text by Steve Smith.