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Millook Haven Folding
England
Millook Haven in north Cornwall is a famous location among geologists because of the chevron folds in the cliff, visible from near the footpath onto the beach. This panorama was taken slightly further to the north, at a location used by local climbers. The beds in this view are mostly composed of sandstone, which has deformed in a brittle way, fracturing into blocks, faulting and remaining roughly the same thickness throughout the bed. If you look carefully, you can see white quartz veins perpendicular to the sandstone bedding planes, a fault and evidence of flexural slip along the bedding planes during folding and faulting. The effects of this slip are visible in the block at the base (nadir) of the image, where grooves called slickensides show the direction of movement of the bedding plane against the overlying bed that has subsequently been removed. If you look very carefully, you might also see a folded shale bed in the cliff, which is much thicker in the core than in the limbs and which shows axial-planar cleavage. There are much better examples elsewhere in the cliff on the beach. In the distance, you can see the east-west strike of the sandstone beds in the wave cut platform of the beach.
Copyright: Mark Vanstone
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 9450x4725
Taken: 26/02/2013
Uploaded: 26/02/2013
Updated: 04/04/2015
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Tags: millook haven; beach; cliff; folding; faulting; geology; slickensides; flexural slip
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