Open Map
Close Map
N
Projections and Nav Modes
  • Normal View
  • Fisheye View
  • Architectural View
  • Stereographic View
  • Little Planet View
  • Panini View
Click and Drag / QTVR mode
このパノラマをシェアする
(This panorama is not available for embedding)
For Non-Commercial Use Only
This panorama can be embedded into a non-commercial site at no charge. 詳しくはこちら
Do you agree to the Terms & Conditions?
For commercial use, 連絡ください
Embed this Panorama
高さ
For Non-Commercial Use Only
For commercial use, 連絡ください
LICENSE MODAL

0 Likes

Uros islands, Lake Titikaka, Puno, Peru
Peru

The Uros islands at 3810 meters above sea level are just five kilometers west from Puno port. Around 2,000 descendants of the Uros were counted in the 1997 census, although only a few hundred still live on and maintain the islands; most have moved to the mainland.  The Uros are a pre-Incan people who live on forty-two self-fashioned floating islands in Lake Titicaca Puno, Peru and Bolivia. They form three main groups: Uru-Chipayas, Uru-Muratos and the Uru-Iruitos. 

The Uros use bundles of dried totora reeds to make reed boats (balsas mats), and to make the islands themselves. The larger islands house about ten families, while smaller ones, only about thirty meters wide, house only two or three. The islets are made of totora reeds, which grow in the lake. The dense roots that the plants develop and interweave form a natural layer called Khili (about one to two meters thick) that support the islands. They are anchored with ropes attached to sticks driven into the bottom of the lake. The reeds at the bottoms of the islands rot away fairly quickly, so new reeds are added to the top constantly, about every three months; this is what makes it exciting for tourists when walking on the island. This is especially important in the rainy season when the reeds rot much faster. The islands last about thirty years.

Each step on an island sinks about 2-4" depending on the density of the ground underfoot. As the reeds dry, they break up more and more as they are walked upon. As the reed breaks up and moisture gets to it, it rots, and a new layer has to be added to it. It is a lot of work to maintain the islands. [Wikipedia]

Copyright: Brian Richards
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 13732x6866
Taken: 30/06/2014
送信日: 16/11/2017
更新日: 06/01/2019
見られた回数:

...


Tags: culture; landscape; seascape; water; sun; people
comments powered by Disqus
More About Peru


It looks like you’re creating an order.
If you have any questions before you checkout, just let us know at info@360cities.net and we’ll get right back to you.