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Stehekin ~ cliff edge looking to High Bridge
USA

This location where the Stehekin Valley Road goes over High Bridge is also where a Pacific Crest Trail access pathway intersects (the High Bridge Campground is also nearby).

As I stepped down onto this rock to get a view from this short cliff edge to the Stehekin River below (which looks over toward High Bridge), I wasn't really sure I wanted to set up my tripod and camera out here.


The sky was overcast this weekend (not at all fabulous), but more than that, there was less than three-foot circular diameter of space. And the way I do 360 panoramas is to walk around my tripod capturing views in all directions with a fish-eye lens (to later be digitally stitched), which leaves very little space for me to stay out of each photo while circling the tripod legs on a wet (it was raining) mossy rock.

Hoping this rock was stable and would not peel away from the cliff it was part of, I decided I wanted this vantage point.  A young tree was putting roots down around this particular rock and perhaps expanding spaces each year, yet I was more concerned about moving its branches (unavoidable) too much for a decent enough photo.


On a side note, last spring I had unexpectedly gone into the Chelan River with my tripod, camera and another fish-eye lens (it didn't recover, but all else eventually dried out) when the rather large dry rock I was perched on decided to roll to one side (and it wasn't mossy).  

By the way, since I'm sharing more of my thought processes here, be sure to toggle full-screen.  And if you haven't experienced panoramas with even an economical Google "Cardboard" viewer (or a fancy stereo headset) with your smartphone, please ask a friend to see one with their viewer; experience it for yourself. I believe it will take you to another level of engagement with worldwide locations. Then you may find yourself traveling more too!  ;)

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Copyright: Timothy Oldfield ~ Washington State 360
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Taken: 15/10/2016
Uploaded: 18/10/2016
Updated: 30/07/2018
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Tags: river; gorge; cliff; rock; log; bridge; trees; wilderness; moss; trail
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More About USA

The United States is one of the most diverse countries on earth, jam packed full of amazing sights from St. Patrick's cathedral in New York to Mount Hollywood California.The Northeast region is where it all started. Thirteen British colonies fought the American Revolution from here and won their independence in the first successful colonial rebellion in history. Take a look at these rolling hills carpeted with foliage along the Hudson river here, north of New York City.The American south is known for its polite people and slow pace of life. Probably they move slowly because it's so hot. Southerners tend not to trust people from "up north" because they talk too fast. Here's a cemetery in Georgia where you can find graves of soldiers from the Civil War.The West Coast is sort of like another country that exists to make the east coast jealous. California is full of nothing but grizzly old miners digging for gold, a few gangster rappers, and then actors. That is to say, the West Coast functions as the imagination of the US, like a weird little brother who teases everybody then gets famous for making freaky art.The central part of the country is flat farmland all the way over to the Rocky Mountains. Up in the northwest corner you can find creative people in places like Portland and Seattle, along with awesome snowboarding and good beer. Text by Steve Smith.